Site Search

A smiling female student drips a chemical into a vial.A smiling female student drips a chemical into a vial.

HON-Honors

HON100 - Honors and University Orientation

This course provides the Honors student with a fairly comprehensive introduction to University life in general and the Honors Program in particular. Practical matters, including a comprehensive review of the Honors Program curriculum, requirements to remain in the program, advisement and registration procedures to be followed, and an elaboration and description of ancillary University services available to the student, are covered. The meaning and function of a university, the importance of the liberal/general education part of the curriculum, the relationship between the university and society, and current issues affecting the academy are addressed through selected readings and discussion. Also, students will be required to establish a portfolio that will be maintained throughout the undergraduate experience. (1 cr.)

HON150 - Honors Composition I

Honors Composition I, a course designed specifically for first-year students in the Honors Program, is an introduction to the advanced literacy of the academy. In this course, students will develop an understanding of how diverse scholarly disciplines employ differing strategies and conventions for organizing and transmitting knowledge. (3 crs.)

HON187 - Research Methods

This course acquaints students with basic research methodology. Students will learn how to find information and evaluate and use it effectively. Students receive a hands-on introduction to research and writing and learn about various research approaches, preparing them for upper level courses. Prerequisite: Honors student or permission of the director of Honors and the instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON200 - Honors Research Practice I

This course is intended for undergraduate Honors students in the second year. It builds on concepts introduced in HON 100 and HON 250, and it should serve as preparation both for the Honors Thesis Project (HON 499) and for other research projects related to Honors coursework or major coursework. Prerequisites: HON 100 and HON 250, or permission of instructor. (1 cr.) Not repeatable for additional credit.

HON201 - Quantitative Problem Solving

This course will provide the student with an application-oriented, investigative quantitative problem-solving curriculum. Drawing from diverse disciplines in the fields of mathematics, engineering, the physical and life sciences, business, finance, computer science, and/or the social sciences, students will use technology and cooperative group work to solve real-life problems and gain a greater understanding and appreciation for quantitative analysis. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: Student must pass parts A and B of the Math Placement Exam or have an SAT math score of 540 or higher or have successfully taken College Algebra. In addition, this course is open to Honors student or requires the permission of the director of Honors and the instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON250 - Honors Composition II

Honors Composition II, a course designed specifically for first-year students in the Honors Program, is a companion and follow-up course to Honors Composition I. In Honors Composition II, students will investigate an academic research question on a topic and in a field of their choosing and produce a research paper addressing this question. Research results will be presented before a panel of interested peers and faculty. Prerequisite: HON 150 or equivalent. (3 crs.)

HON265 - Global Transitions to 1300

This transdisciplinary course rooted in the history of humankind is the first in a two-semester sophomore sequence on the origin, nature, accomplishments, and failures of the diverse complex societies of this planet. This panoramic investigation focuses on two major themes: 1) human interactions with the natural world, and 2) the ways that human societies have changed, grown apart from one another, re-established contact and influenced one another. This course covers the dawn of humankind to approximately 1300 C.E. Global Transitions to 1300 is a standalone course and need not be taken in conjunction with Global Transitions since 1300. Prerequisite: HON 250 or permission of the director of Honors and the instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON270 - Global Transitions Since 1300

This transdisciplinary course rooted in the history of humankind is the second in a two-semester sophomore sequence on the origin, nature, accomplishments and failures of the diverse complex societies of this planet. This panoramic investigation focuses on two major themes: 1) human interactions with the natural world, and 2) the ways that human societies have changed, grown apart from one another, re-established contact, and influenced one another. This course covers events from approximately 1300 C.E. to the present. Global Transitions since 1300 is a standalone course and need not be taken in conjunction with Global Transitions to 1300. Prerequisite: HON 250 or permission of the director of Honors and the instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON300 - Honors Research Practice II

This course is intended for undergraduate Honors students in the third year. It builds on concepts introduced in HON 100, HON 200, and HON 250, and it should serve as preparation both for the Honors Thesis Project (HON 499) and for other research projects related to Honors coursework or major coursework. Prerequisite: HON 200, or permission of instructor. (1 cr.) Notrepeatable for additional credit.

HON320 - Topics in Self and Society

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the relationship between the self and society with the specific topic of each offering determined by the instructor. The selected topic may be explored through a combination of any of, but not limited to, the following approaches: history; political science; sociology; psychology; anthropology; economics; linguistics; archaeology; communications; ethnic, race, and gender studies; law; social work; and urban and rural studies. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: HON 250 or permission of the director of Honors and the instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON325 - Topics in Education

This course provides students with an examination of issues relating to varying approaches to and impacts of education with a specific topic chosen by the instructor. The selected topic may be explored through a combination of any of the following approaches: use of multiple instructional strategies, varied methodologies, and pedagogy; the history and/or philosophy of education; epistemology; and educational anthropology. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: HON 250 or permission of the director of Honors and the instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON330 - Topics in Culture and Society

Culture is not a new idea, and its meaning is a subject of debate. This course employs culture (and its political uses) as a lens through which to examine topics and texts in a range of disciplines from the social sciences, to media studies, to the humanities. In the process, this course examines some of the most pressing issues of today and the past. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: HON 250 or permission of the director of Honors and the instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON335 - Topics in Science and Technology

This course is an interdisciplinary foray into the hard sciences. It does not presume a prior extensive knowledge of chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, the environmental sciences, applications of technology and/or the philosophy or history of science. The course defines science and technology, their terminology and method of inquiry, the philosophical ideas underlying scientific inquiry, and how humans value them. Various topics, especially from the physical sciences, may be examined with an emphasis on the specific ways scientific inquiry tries to understand our experience, whether it reflects universal rationality or particular cultural concerns, whether it offers understanding of nature or only control of (some) natural processes, and what impacts – both positive and negative – the application of technology has. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: HON 250 or permission of the director of Honors and the instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON340 - Topics in Arts and Humanities

Each class will focus on a specific topic selected by the instructor. The selected topic may be explored through a combination of any of, but not limited to, the following mediums: literature, the fine arts, creative writing, photography, the graphic arts, music, theatre and film. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: HON 250 or permission of the director of Honors and the instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON450 - Honors Study Tour

Each class will be closely linked to a short-term study tour, either in the United States or abroad, and focus on a specific topic selected by the instructor. The purpose of this course is to provide students with experiential hands-on learning. In addition, this course will expose students to diverse academic and socio-cultural experiences, better preparing them for the community within which they will play a future role. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the director of the Honors Program and instructor of record. (3 crs.)

HON490 - Honors Research Seminar

This course is intended for undergraduate students at any stage of the University Honors Program who wish to develop an independent research project within their major or related to Honors coursework. Scientific work, research papers, creative efforts, service projects, are just some of the possible research projects. Each project will be tailored to the individual student, will involve close collaboration with a faculty member, and should ultimately be presented publicly or published. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Variable Crs. 1-6) Repeatable for additional credit.

HON499 - Honors Thesis

The senior Honors project serves as the capstone of the University Honors Program. Under the supervision of a faculty adviser of the student's choice, the Honors student seeks to make a substantive contribution to the discipline. Considerable latitude in the form of the contribution is permitted. Empirical and historical research as well as creative products are all appropriate. A reader/reviewer is assigned to independently pass judgment on the student's scholastic effort. An oral defense, demonstration, or display of the completed honors project is required. (3 crs.)