MOTHS WORK THE NIGHT SHIFT AS POLLINATORS

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MOTHS WORK THE NIGHT SHIFT AS POLLINATORS

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Posted on October 15, 2015

 “The Moth Project” by PlantBot Genetics   
5:30 p.m. Oct. 20
Duda Hall, Room 116 
Moth on a leaf

As honeybee populations decline, both farmers and backyard gardeners look to alternative pollinators. “The Moth Project” takes a closer look at insects working the night shift in fields, woodlands and gardens — the 14,500 species of moths found in the United States.

Artists Wendy DesChene and Jeff Schmucki, working collaboratively as PlantBot Genetics, have created a series of portable ‘garden machines’ designed to highlight the beauty of these nighttime fliers while attracting moths for pollination. 

Their garden machines have been placed in urban areas, such as parking lots and rooftops, as well as in rural fields. 

The project blends art and sustainability with entomological and horticultural research to foster environmental awareness and an interest in science.

“The Moth Project” presentation:

  • Describes the role of moths as alternative pollinators.
  • Underscores concerns about conditions, such as Colony Collapse Disorder, that have dramatically reduced the number of honeybees in the United States.
  • Explains the simple steps that backyard gardeners and citizen scientists can take to attract and nurture moths.
  • Discusses the artistic collaboration and underlying research behind “The Moth Project.”

Join us

This free presentation is hosted by the Department of Art and Design. The public is welcome to attend. Visitor parking is available in the Vulcan Garage, off Third Street near the campus entrance. Metered parking also is available in Lot 11, behind Gallagher Hall.

Get directions or a campus map