CMD-Communication Disorders

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Course Descriptions By Program

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CMD600 - Research and Professional Practice in Speech-Language Pathology

This course is designed to teach the graduate student to be both a consumer and producer of research. A research endeavor (research paper, project or thesis) is a requirement of graduation and is initiated in this class. Practice patterns in the profession (ethical, clinical and legal aspects) are also addressed.

CMD701 - Language Disorders in Adults

This course will prepare the graduate student with the academic information necessary to assess and treat language disorders in the adult population, including those patients diagnosed with cerebrovascular accident, dementia, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and others.

CMD702 - Language Disorders in Children

Challenged by the number and diversity of language disorders, the graduate student will demonstrate the ability to appropriately select from a number of evidence-based treatments the one(s) most likely to build language within the language delayed or disordered child. The graduate student will demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings upon which each treatment is built, and the key components of each. He/she will be able to assess not only the strengths and weaknesses of the treatment protocol, but the strengths and opportunities to improve while watching peers actually use the treatment during classroom presentations. He will reach “mastery level” for administration of 5 standardized language tests commonly given to children.

CMD703 - Fluency Disorders

This course provides the student with extensive information about the etiology and development of stuttering, appraisal of symptoms and underlying processes, and treatment of beginning, intermediate and advanced stuttering in both children and adults. Review of major theories and therapies is provided with special emphasis placed on the effectiveness of combining these therapies eclectically. Through lecture, videotapes, in-class practice and clinical observation, the student is exposed to all the necessary theoretical and practical information necessary for basic evaluation and treatment of stutterers.

CMD705 - Voice Disorders

The purpose of this course is to provide comprehensive academic and clinical training in the etiological factors, description, and management of organic voice disorders. The teaching of esophageal speech, the use of the artificial larynx, and the study of tracheo-esophageal practice are covered in detail.

CMD707 - Phonology and Articulation

This course will prepare the serious student with the academic information necessary to assess and treat articulatory and phonologic disorders of both organic and functional origin. Assessment and treatment of special populations (delays, disorders, and cross-cultural variances) will be emphasized.

CMD708 - Neurology

This course is designed to provide the student with a understanding of the neurological governance of the body as that body carries out its communication functions: speaking, voicing, hearing, comprehending, perceiving, thinking and remembering. After appropriate review of neurologic development, structure and function within the context of normalcy, deviations from normal (secondary to disease, defect, aging, stress, injury or disorder) will be discussed. Hemisphericity (including split brain research), visual neglect, cognitive style and comparative anatomy will also be presented. Though substantial amounts of anatomical information will be presented, the overriding style of the course is highly pragmatic. Clinical application for the speech pathologist will be the central theme of this course.

CMD711 - Applied Therapeutic Procedures in the Preschool Setting

The class, resembling a lab experience, provides the graduate student with an “hands-on” experience in a preschool setting with typically-developing children, as well as children having speech, language, and /or other hearing disorders in a preschool setting.

CMD712 - Applied Therapeutic Procedures in the Outpatient Setting

This practicum course provides the beginning student of communication disorders with the opportunity for real life client contact. He/she will learn by doing! He/she will be assigned to provide either diagnostic or therapeutic services to a communicatively-impaired outpatient who is enrolled in the university speech and hearing clinic. A faculty supervisor will direct the graduate student in his work with the client. Models and theories of typical/atypical growth and behavior across age groups covered in this class will be discussed in such a manner that students begin to understand, and/or apply evidenced-based information to form therapeutic strategies related to cognition, communication, emotional/social development, motor development, sensory integration, and adaptation. A major focus is on basic human communication processes including (a) anatomical and physiological bases, (b) the physical and psychophysical bases, and (c) linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects. A major theme in this class is to learn about therapeutic intervention strategies, materials and resources used with the language, articulation, stuttering, voice, dysphagia, and children with syndromes and adult populations. Federal entitlements that relate to the provision of specialized service, service options, and equipment for individuals with speech and language disabilities will be introduced as appropriate. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be discussed. This practicum course provides the graduate student with a realistic, practical, and comprehensive overview of clinical problems that are often encountered by the beginning clinician in an outpatient clinic setting. Beginning clinicians will take their first steps into the real world of clinical practice when assigned to clients in the university clinic. Advanced graduate students may enroll in this practicum class to gain specialized skill, or to work with complicated clients. This is a “hands-on” course where the student should expect some client contact. A major focus will be to consider all the important aspects of client management, including but not limited to creation and maintenance of an effective learning environment, the establishment of a climate of fairness, the use of challenging/consistent standards and goals, within a safe physical environment, where universal precautions are consistently taught and demonstrated, where treatment principles are evidence-based, student diversity is addressed appropriately, community needs and resources are adequate, and Pa. academic standards are met.

CMD713 - Applied Diagnostic Procedures in Speech Pathology

This practicum course provides the beginning student of communication disorders with the opportunity for real life client contact. He/she will learn by doing! He/she will be assigned to provide diagnostic services to communicatively-impaired clients who seek clinical care from the university clinic. The graduate student will be involved at all levels of client contact, including but not limited to (a) accepting referrals, (b) taking a case history, (c) administering tests, (d) making clinical observations, (e) interpreting results and behaviors, (f) generating treatment plans, (h) making recommendations, (I) counseling patients and families, and (j) communicating results to other medical and educational personnel verbally and in writing. A faculty supervisor will direct the graduate student in ALL appraisal and diagnostic work with clients. Models and theories of typical/atypical growth and behavior across age groups covered in this class will be discussed in such a manner that students begin to understand, and/or apply evidenced-based information to form therapeutic strategies related to cognition, communication, emotional/social development, motor development, sensory integration, and adaptation. A major focus is on basic human communication processes including (a) anatomical and physiological bases, (b) psychophysical bases, (c) linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects, and (d) social, behavioral, and cultural aspects. A major theme in this class is to learn about therapeutic intervention strategies, materials and resources used with the language, articulation, stuttering, voice, dysphagia, and syndromic children and adult populations. This practicum course provides the graduate student with a realistic, practical, and comprehensive overview of formal and informal, standardized and non-standardized diagnostic and assessment procedures commonly used by speech-language pathologists. It is the clinician's first step into the real world of diagnostic practice. Once the graduate student is familiar with a diagnostic procedure, he will be given the opportunity to administer it to clients under direct supervision of an AHSA-certified faculty member. This is a “hands-on” course where the student should expect extensive client contact. A major focus will be to consider all the important aspects of client management, including but not limited to creation and maintenance of an effective learning environment, the establishment of a climate of fairness, the use of challenging/consistent standards and goals, within a safe physical environment, where universal precautions are consistently taught and demonstrated, where treatment principles are evidence-based, student diversity is addressed appropriately, community needs and resources are adequate, and Pa. academic standards are met. Federal entitlements that relate to the provision of specialized service, service options, and equipment for individuals with speech and language disabilities will be introduced as appropriate. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be discussed.

CMD714 - Applied Audiologic Diagnostic and Rehavilitative Procedures

This practicum course provides the beginning student of communication disorders with the opportunity for real life client contact. He/she will learn by doing! He/she will be assigned to provide audiologic screening and therapy services to clients who seek audiologic care from this university clinic. The graduate student will be involved at all levels of client contact, including but not limited to (a) accepting referrals, (b) taking a case history, (c) screening the hearing ability of clients, (d) making clinical observations, (e) interpreting screening results and behaviors, (f) generating aural habilitation/ rehabilitation treatment plans, (h) making recommendations, (i) counseling patients and families, and (j) communicating results to other medical and educational personnel verbally and in writing. A certified SLP or audiologist supervisor will direct the graduate student in ALL of his screening and therapeutic work with clients. This practicum course provides the graduate student with a realistic, practical, and comprehensive overview of formal and informal, standardized and non-standardized assessment and therapeutic procedures commonly used by speech-language pathologists during the provision of audiological screening, or aural habilitation or rehabilitation. It is the clinician's first step into the real world of basic audiological practice. Clinical experiences provided through CMD 714 will comply with ASHA standards which clearly define the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists when providing audiologic services. Once the graduate student is familiar with specific procedures, he will be given the opportunity for "hands-on" client interaction under direct supervision of an ASHA-certified faculty- audiologist. Models and theories of typical/atypical growth and behavior across age groups covered in this class will be discussed in such a manner that students begin to understand, and/or apply evidenced-based information to form therapeutic strategies related to cognition, communication, emotional/social development, motor development, sensory integration, and adaptation. A major focus is on basic human communication processes including (a) anatomical and physiological bases, (b) the physical and psychophysical bases, and (c) linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects. A major theme in this class is to learn about therapeutic intervention strategies, materials and resources used with the speech, language, and syndromic populations. This is a “hands-on” course where the student should expect some client contact. A major focus will be to consider all the important aspects of client management, including but not limited to creation and maintenance of an effective learning environment, the establishment of a climate of fairness, the use of challenging/consistent standards and goals, within a safe physical environment, where universal precautions are consistently taught and demonstrated, where treatment principles are evidence-based, student diversity is addressed appropriately, community needs and resources are adequate, and Pennsylvania academic standards are met. Federal entitlements that relate to the provision of specialized service, service options, and equipment for individuals with speech and language disabilities will be introduced as appropriate. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be discussed.

CMD715 - Applied Therapeutic Procedures in the Educational Setting

This practicum course provides the beginning student of communication disorders with the opportunity for real life client contact. He/she will learn by doing! He/she will be assigned to provide either diagnostic or therapeutic services (or both) to communicatively-impaired children who is enrolled in private, public, elementary, middle school, or high school programs. A school-based, ASHA certified SLP will serve as the on-site supervisor, directing the graduate student in his work with clients under the liaison-guidance of assigned faculty from the university. This practicum course provides the graduate student with a realistic, practical, and comprehensive overview of clinical problems that are often encountered by the speech-language pathologist in the public or private educational setting. It may be the clinician's first step into the real world of clinical practice outside of the university clinic. The advanced graduate student may also enroll in CMD 715 to achieve specialized knowledge about the SLP as an educator. Throughout his graduate program, a student may enroll in CMD 715 more than one time. Since the mission of CMD 715 is to afford the graduate student with the opportunity to learn from a variety of others, it is assumed that each subsequent enrollment will occur in a different school or with a different school-based supervisor. ASHA requires that a student must complete practicum courses in three distinct sites. Such settings may include separate units/settings within a single organization IF each of those units provides a unique experience. Before RE-ENROLLING in this course, the graduate student should establish that the setting offers him a uniquely different experience than offered by previous settings. Models and theories of typical/atypical growth and behavior across age groups covered in this class will be discussed in such a manner that students begin to understand, and/or apply evidenced-based information to form therapeutic strategies related to cognition, communication, emotional/social development, motor development, sensory integration, and adaptation. A major focus is on basic human communication processes including (a) anatomical and physiological bases, (b) the physical and psychophysical bases, and (c) linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects. A major theme in this class is to learn about therapeutic intervention strategies, materials and resources used with the language, articulation, stuttering, voice, dysphagia, and syndromic children population. This is a “hands-on” course where the student should expect some client contact. A major focus will be to consider all the important aspects of client management, including but not limited to creation and maintenance of an effective learning environment, the establishment of a climate of fairness, the use of challenging/consistent standards and goals, within a safe physical environment, where universal precautions are consistently taught and demonstrated, where treatment principles are evidence-based, student diversity is addressed appropriately, community needs and resources are adequate, and Pa. academic standards are met. Federal entitlements that relate to the provision of specialized service, service options, and equipment for individuals with speech and language disabilities will be introduced as appropriate. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be discussed.

CMD716 - Applied Neurogenic Procedures in Healthcare Facilities

This practicum course provides the beginning student of communication disorders with the opportunity for real life client contact. He/she will be learn by doing! He/she will be assigned to provide either diagnostic or therapeutic services within a healthcare setting outside of the university clinic. A facility-based, ASHAcertified speech-language pathologist will serve as the on-site supervisor, directing the graduate student in all of his work with clients under the liaison-guidance of assigned faculty. Models and theories of typical/atypical growth and behavior across age groups covered in this class will be discussed in such a manner that students begin to understand, and/or apply evidenced-based information to form therapeutic strategies related to cognition, communication, emotional/social development, motor development, sensory integration, and adaptation. A major focus is on basic human communication processes including (a) anatomical and physiological bases, (b) the physical and psychophysical bases, and (c) linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects. A major theme in this class is to learn about therapeutic intervention strategies, materials and resources used with the language, articulation, stuttering, voice, dysphagia, and syndromic children and adult population. This is a “hands-on” course where the student should expect some client contact. A major focus will be to consider all the important aspects of client management, including but not limited to creation and maintenance of an effective learning environment, the establishment of a climate of fairness, the use of challenging/consistent standards and goals, within a safe physical environment, where universal precautions are consistently taught and demonstrated, where treatment principles are evidence-based, student diversity is addressed appropriately, community needs and resources are adequate, and Pa. academic standards are met. Federal entitlements that relate to the provision of specialized service, service options, and equipment for individuals with speech and language disabilities will be introduced as appropriate. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be discussed.

CMD718 - Advanced Audiology for the SLP

This course will provide the student with an understanding of behavioral and electrophysiological assessments for the determination of the location of pathology within the auditory system. The student will be introduced to concepts concerning specification, selection, fitting, care, and use of amplification systems. Models and theories of typical/atypical growth and behavior across age groups covered in this class will be discussed in such a manner that students begin to understand, and/or apply evidenced-based information to form therapeutic strategies related to cognition, communication, emotional/social development, motor development, sensory integration, and adaptation. A major focus is on basic human communication processes including (a) anatomical and physiological bases, (b) the physical and psychophysical bases, and (c) linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects. A major theme in this class is to learn about therapeutic intervention strategies, materials and resources used with the speech, language, and syndromic population. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be discussed.

CMD732 - Counseling in Speech-Language Pathology

This course will provide a theoretical and practical framework for the role of the speech-language pathologist in counseling individuals with communication and swallowing disorders. Emphasis will be placed on (1) selfidentifying strengths and areas of need as a clinician relative to the daily practice of interaction (2) applying a theory-based framework for counseling in the clinical setting (3) mastering the application of counseling microskills and (4) communicating effectively, recognizing the needs, values, preferred communication, and cultural/linguistic background of the client, client’s family, caregivers, and relevant others.

CMD763 - Communication Problems of Special Groups

This course will focus on the difference in speech/language of non-native users of English, with attention given to assessing when and what types of intervention are ethically and professionally appropriate. Dialectical differences and professional/corporate speech will also be included, along with professional issues and marketing of services to the public. Models and theories of typical/atypical growth and behavior across age groups covered in this class will be discussed in such a manner that students begin to understand, and/or apply evidenced-based information to form therapeutic strategies related to cognition, communication, emotional/social development, motor development, sensory integration, and adaptation. A major focus is on basic human communication processes including (a) anatomical and physiological bases, (b) the physical and psychophysical bases, and (c) linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects. A major theme in this class is to learn about therapeutic intervention strategies, materials and resources used with the language, articulation, stuttering, voice, dysphagia, and syndromic population. Federal entitlements that relate to the provision of specialized service, service options, and equipment for individuals with speech and language disabilities will be introduced as appropriate. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be discussed.

CMD764 - Instrumentation in Speech Language Pathology

A practical course in the use of instrumentation in the practice of Speech Language Pathology. A major focus is on basic human communication processesincluding (a) anatomical and physiological bases, (b) the physical and psychophysical bases, and (c) linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects.

CMD765 - Dysphagia

This course is an in-depth study of deglutition (the normal act of swallowing) and dysphagia (swallowing disorders). It is deliberately designed in full, comprehensive, and particularized fashion because of the medical seriousness of dysphagia and its treatment: people DO DIE from dysphagia and from medical/clinical mistakes made in treating it. The course appropriately begins with anatomy and function of both normal and abnormal swallow patterns, then focuses on proper diagnosis and appraisal through the use of clinical exams, radiographic contrast examinations, electromyography, esophagoscopy, endoscopy and manometry. The final portion of the course focuses on surgical and therapeutic treatment strategies for the wide variety of dysphagic symptoms that exist for pediatric through geriatric populations. Some patient contact during the course should be expected. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be discussed.

CMD766 - Traumatic Brain Injury

When working with many communication impairments, the speech/language pathologist functions as an individual practitioner fostering the necessary changes for the client by him-herself. Rehabilitation of the individual with traumatic brain injury (TBI) requires a diversified team of professionals working together throughout a lengthy continuum of care. In this class, the student will understand the individual and team goals for the client. The following topics will be addressed through lectures, in-class diagnosis, treatment, psychosocial and familial disturbances, conceptual issues, neuropsychological problems, cognition and memory deficits, language disorders, motor speech problems, augmentative communication, and pharmacological issues. Federal entitlements that relate to the provision of specialized service, service options, and equipment for individuals with speech and language disabilities will be introduced as appropriate. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be addressed.

CMD772 - Augmentative and Alternative Communication

This course is an in-depth study of: 1)The underlying theory of augmentative and alternative communication systems (AAC) including state-of-the-art and emerging technologies; and 2) Methodology for assessing and training individuals with communication disorders to use AAC systems. Emphasis is placed on functional strategies for the practicing clinician in AAC. Hands-on experience with various AAC systems is an integral part of this course Models and theories of typical/atypical growth and behavior across age groups covered in this class will be discussed in such a manner that students begin to understand, and/or apply evidenced-based information to form therapeutic strategies related to cognition, communication, emotional/social development, motor development, sensory integration, and adaptation A major focus is on basic human communication processes including (a) anatomical and physiological bases, (b) the physical and psychophysical bases, and (c) linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects. A major theme in this class is to learn about therapeutic intervention strategies, materials and resources used with the language, articulation, stuttering, voice, dysphagia, and syndromic population. Where appropriate, service delivery models (collaboration, co-treatment, integration, pull-out of individuals and groups) will be discussed.

CMD785 - Seminar in Medical Speech-Language Pathology

A course in which students advance their knowledge in a specific content area not covered by other courses in the practice of Medical Speech-Language Pathology. This includes applied physiology and practice mechanics of particular relevance to healthcare settings. Particular emphasis is placed on evidence-based practice and the trans-disciplinary treatment model for communicatively or swallow-impaired patients who have multiple medical problems.