Call for Honors Course Proposals

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Call for Honors Course Proposals

     The University Honors Program would like to solicit proposals from faculty interested in teaching Honors courses.  We are especially interested in innovative, academically challenging, experiential, student-centered classes with a strong research / creative (interpreted broadly) emphasis.  An ideal course would give a small class of students (<20) and their instructor(s) the opportunity to work together to create new knowledge and make a contribution to one or more disciplinary conversations.

     The UHP can provide administrative support as well as funding for course-related programming and experiential learning opportunities (excursions, guest speakers, materials, museum visits, etc.).  The Honors classroom is a fully equipped smart room and the computer lab is a new (2014) hybrid space with desktop and notebook computers.

     We are generating a pool of potential courses for future semesters and encourage all interested faculty to submit a proposal by 15 November or 15 March.  The proposal should fit one of the course descriptions below (broadly construed). It should include, name, rank, department and a 50-200 word description of the course.  The description should include the course number (see list below), what general education requirement it would fulfill (if any), a sense of the subject matter as well as the assessment.  We are particularly interested in courses that will result in students’ production of conference-quality final projects.

     The UHP will work with department chairs and deans to insure that any Honors course taught will be within regular teaching loads.

Please send your proposals (or questions) to M. G. Aune at aune@calu.edu or Craig Fox at fox@calu.edu.

HON 200. HONORS RESEARCH PRACTICE I. (spring only)
This course is intended for undergraduate Honors students in the second year.  It builds on concepts introduced in HON 100 and HON 250, and it should serve as preparation both for the Honors Thesis Project (HON 499) and for other research projects related to Honors coursework or major coursework. (1 cr.) 

HON 300. HONORS RESEARCH PRACTICE II. (spring only)
This course is intended for undergraduate Honors students in the third year.  It builds on concepts introduced in HON 100, HON 200, and HON 250, and it should serve as preparation both for the Honors Thesis Project (HON 499) and for other research projects related to Honors coursework or major coursework. (1 cr.)

HON 265. GLOBAL TRANSITIONS I.
This transdisciplinary course rooted in the history of humankind is the first in a two-semester sophomore sequence on the origin, nature, accomplishments, and failures of the diverse complex societies of this planet. This panoramic investigation focuses on two major themes: 1) human interactions with the natural world, and 2) the ways that human societies have changed, grown apart from one another, reestablished contact, and influenced one another. This course covers the dawn of humankind to approximately1300 C.E. Global Transitions I is a stand alone course and need not be taken in conjunction with Global Transitions II. (3 crs.)

HON 270. GLOBAL TRANSITIONS II.
This transdisciplinary course rooted in the history of humankind is the second in a two-semester sophomore sequence on the origin, nature, accomplishments, and failures of the diverse complex societies of this planet. This panoramic investigation focuses on two major themes: 1) human interactions with the natural world, and 2) the ways that human societies have changed, grown apart from one another, reestablished contact, and influenced one another. This course covers events from approximately 1300 C.E. to the present. Global Transitions II is a stand alone course and need not be taken in conjunction with Global Transitions I. (3 crs.)

HON 320. TOPICS IN SELF AND SOCIETY.
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the relationship between the self and society with the specific topic of each offering determined by the instructor. The selected topic may be explored through a combination of any of, but not limited to, the following approaches: history; political science; sociology; psychology; anthropology; economics; linguistics; archaeology; communications; ethnic, race, and gender studies; law; social work; and urban and rural studies. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. (3 crs.)

HON 325. TOPICS IN EDUCATION.
This course provides students with an examination of issues relating to varying approaches to and impacts of education with a specific topic chosen by the instructor. The selected topic may be explored through a combination of any of the following approaches: instructional strategies, methodologies, and pedagogies; the history and/or philosophy of education; epistemology; and educational anthropology. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. (3 crs.)

HON 330. TOPICS IN CULTURE AND SOCIETY.
Culture is not a new idea, and its meaning is a subject of debate. This course employs culture (and its political uses) as a lens through which to examine topics and texts in a range of disciplines from the social sciences, to media studies, to the humanities. In the process, this course examines some of the most pressing issues of today and the past. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. (3 crs.)

HON 335. TOPICS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY.
This course is an interdisciplinary foray into the hard sciences. It does not presume a prior extensive knowledge of chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, the environmental sciences, applications of technology and/or the philosophy or history of science. The course defines science and technology, their terminology and method of inquiry, the philosophical ideas underlying scientific inquiry, and how humans value them. Various topics, especially from the physical sciences, may be examined with an emphasis on the specific ways scientific inquiry tries to understand our experience, whether it reflects universal rationality or particular cultural concerns, whether it offers understanding of nature or only control of (some) natural processes, and what impacts –both positive and negative – the application of technology has. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. (3 crs.)

HON 340. TOPICS IN THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES.
Each class will focus on a specific topic selected by the instructor. The selected topic may be explored through a combination of any of, but not limited to, the following mediums: literature, the fine arts, creative writing, photography, the graphic arts, music, theatre, and film. This course is repeatable with the permission of the instructor. (3 crs.)

HON 490 HONORS RESEARCH SEMINAR.
This course is intended for undergraduate students at any stage of the University Honors Program who wish to develop an independent research project within their major or related to Honors coursework.  Scientific work, research papers, creative efforts, service projects, are just some of the possible research projects.  Each project will be tailored to the individual student, will involve close collaboration with a faculty member, and should ultimately be presented publicly or published.  Variable credits (1-6).  Repeatable for additional credit.